My Blog

Posts for: February, 2018

By Richard Hamaty
February 26, 2018
Category: Oral Health
InTodaysNFLOralHygieneTakesCenterStage

Everyone knows that in the game of football, quarterbacks are looked up to as team leaders. That's why we're so pleased to see some NFL QB's setting great examples of… wait for it… excellent oral hygiene.

First, at the 2016 season opener against the Broncos, Cam Newton of the Carolina Panthers was spotted on the bench; in his hands was a strand of dental floss. In between plays, the 2105 MVP was observed giving his hard-to-reach tooth surfaces a good cleaning with the floss.

Later, Buffalo Bills QB Tyrod Taylor was seen on the sideline of a game against the 49ers — with a bottle of mouthwash. Taylor took a swig, swished it around his mouth for a minute, and spit it out. Was he trying to make his breath fresher in the huddle when he called out plays?

Maybe… but in fact, a good mouthrinse can be much more than a short-lived breath freshener.

Cosmetic rinses can leave your breath with a minty taste or pleasant smell — but the sensation is only temporary. And while there's nothing wrong with having good-smelling breath, using a cosmetic mouthwash doesn't improve your oral hygiene — in fact, it can actually mask odors that may indicate a problem, such as tooth decay or gum disease.

Using a therapeutic mouthrinse, however, can actually enhance your oral health. Many commonly available therapeutic rinses contain anti-cariogenic (cavity-fighting) ingredients, such as fluoride; these can help prevent tooth decay and cavity formation by strengthening tooth enamel. Others contain antibacterial ingredients; these can help control the harmful oral bacteria found in plaque — the sticky film that can build up on your teeth in between cleanings. Some antibacterial mouthrinses are available over-the-counter, while others are prescription-only. When used along with brushing and flossing, they can reduce gum disease (gingivitis) and promote good oral health.

So why did Taylor rinse? His coach Rex Ryan later explained that he was cleaning out his mouth after a hard hit, which may have caused some bleeding. Ryan also noted, “He [Taylor] does have the best smelling breath in the league for any quarterback.” The coach didn't explain how he knows that — but never mind. The takeaway is that a cosmetic rinse may be OK for a quick fix — but when it comes to good oral hygiene, using a therapeutic mouthrinse as a part of your daily routine (along with flossing and brushing) can really step up your game.

If you would like more information about mouthrinses and oral hygiene, contact us or schedule a consultation.


By Richard Hamaty
February 18, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
PeriodontalProbingIncreasesAccuracyinDiagnosingGumDisease

If you’re over age 30 there’s a fifty percent chance you have periodontal (gum) disease—and you may not even know it. Without treatment this often “silent” bacterial infection could cause you to lose gum coverage, supporting bone volume or eventually your teeth.

That’s not to say there can’t be noticeable symptoms like swollen, red, bleeding or painful gums. But the surest way to know if you have gum disease, as well as how advanced it is, is to have us examine your gums with manual probing below the gum line.

Using a long metal device called a periodontal probe, we can detect if you’ve developed periodontal pockets. These are gaps created when the diseased gum’s attachment to teeth has weakened and begun to pull away. The increased void may become inflamed (swollen) and filled with infection.

During an exam we insert the probe, which has markings indicating depths in millimeters, into the naturally occurring space between tooth and gums called the sulcus. Normally, the sulcus extends only about 1-3 mm deep, so being able to probe deeper is a sign of a periodontal pocket. How deep we can probe can also tell us about the extent of the infection: if we can probe to 5 mm, you may have early to mild gum disease; 5-7 mm indicates moderate gum disease; and anything deeper is a sign of advanced disease.

Knowing periodontal pocket depth helps guide our treatment strategy. Our main goal is to remove bacterial plaque, a thin film of food particles that collects on teeth and is the main cause and continuing fuel for the infection. In mild to moderate cases this may only require the use of hand instruments called scalers to manually remove plaque from tooth surfaces.

If, however, our periodontal probing indicates deeper, advanced gum disease, we may need to include surgical procedures to access these infected areas through the gum tissue. By knowing the depth and extent of any periodontal pockets, we can determine whether or not to use these more invasive techniques.

Like many other health conditions, discovering gum disease early could help you avoid these more advanced procedures and limit the damage caused by the infection. Besides daily brushing and flossing to remove plaque and regular dental checkups, keep watch for signs of swollen or bleeding gums and contact us for an appointment as soon as possible. And be aware that if you smoke, your gums will not likely bleed or swell—that could make diagnosis more difficult.

If you would like more information on treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Understanding Periodontal Pockets.”


By RICHARD HAMATY
February 07, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Teeth Cleanings  

Surely, your twice daily brushing and once a day flossing are sufficient to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Also, you avoid sugary foods,teeth cleanings and you don't smoke. What more could your oral health need? Well, the American Dental Association says your at-home efforts help tremendously, but your mouth needs the added expertise of your dentist in Yorba Linda, CA. Dr. Richard Hamaty helps hundreds of patients maintain durable, beautiful smiles with a simple service: professional cleaning and oral examination. Here's how those services go.

Come every six months

That's the most beneficial interval for most children through senior adults. During this routine appointment, you'll see your friendly dental hygienist first. She'll update your medical history and ask you if you have any concerns about your teeth and gums. Then, she'll proceed with your hygienic cleaning.

During your cleaning, your hygienist will scale your teeth with a handheld instrument and possibly an ultrasonic cleaner. This procedure removes sticky plaque and hard tartar which forms from food residues on and between teeth and at the gum line.

Why is plaque and tartar removal important? These "biofilms," says the American Academy of Periodontology, contain harmful oral bacteria which secrete acids. The acids lead to tooth decay and gum disease, both leading causes for tooth loss among American adults.

Frankly, your toothbrush and floss at home cannot remove all of these toxic residues, but your hygienist can. Also, you should know that researchers link gum disease to systemic health problems such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and dementia. So the cleaner your teeth and gums are, the healthier you're likely to be.

After she has scaled your teeth, she'll also floss them and polish them with a mildly abrasive toothpaste applied with a rotary brush. Your teeth will feel exceptionally clean and look very bright.

Besides cleaning your teeth, your hygienist takes X-rays (bite wings or panoramic views) to inspect roots and bone structure and to reveal decay hidden between the teeth. She performs what some dentists call a "pocket reading." it's a simple and painless measurement of the spaces between your gums and tooth surfaces. Pockets deeper than three millimeters are diagnostic for gum disease and will be addressed by your Yorba Linda dentist.

The oral examination

The hygienic cleaning prepares the way for Dr. Hamaty's comprehensive oral examination. This service includes:

  • Inspection for decay and gum disease
  • Review of dental alignment
  • Check of fillings, crowns and other restorations
  • Oral cancer assessment

Dr. Hamaty also devises a treatment plan to include needed restorations, preventive care (such as sealants) and cosmetic goals. If you wish to enhance your smile appearance, you should discuss your goals with Dr. Hamaty at your routine appointment.

Be your best

You can have your healthiest and best looking

smile with routine cleanings and check-ups with your Yorba Linda, CA, dentist, Dr. Hamaty. Contact his office today to schedule your appointment, won"t you? Call (714) 779-1313.


AlthoughaChallengeChronicallyIllChildrenNeedToothDecayPrevention

Families of children with chronic conditions face many challenges. One that often takes a back seat to other pressing needs is the prevention of tooth decay. But although difficult, it still deserves caregivers’ attention because of the dental disease’s potential long-term impact on oral health.

Chronically ill children are often at higher risk for tooth decay, most commonly due to challenges in practicing effective oral hygiene. Some conditions create severe physical, mental or behavioral impairments in children’s ability to brush and floss: for example, they may have a heightened gag reflex to toothpaste in their mouth or they may not be able to physically perform these tasks on their own.

Some children may be taking medications that inhibit salivary flow as a side effect. Saliva is critical for disease prevention because it both neutralizes mouth acid (which can erode tooth enamel) and is a first line of defense against disease-causing bacteria. And a child’s diet, while designed to support treatment of their chronic condition, may conversely not be the best for supporting their dental health.

It’s best if caregivers and their dentists develop a strategy for decay prevention, which should include the following:

  • Regular dental visits beginning at Age One. Besides monitoring dental health, dental visits also provide cleanings and other preventive measures like topical fluoride or sealants;
  • Brushing and flossing support. Depending on a child’s physical and mental capacities, caregivers (or an older sibling) may need to model brushing and flossing, or perform the tasks for the child;
  • Medication and diet changes. If medications are causing dry mouth, caregivers can speak to their physicians about possible alternatives; likewise, they should see if modifications can be made to their diet to better support dental health.
  • Boosting salivary flow. It’s especially important with children who have dry mouth to drink more water or use aids (like xylitol gum or candies) to boost salivary flow.

Although it requires extra effort and time to give attention to a chronically ill child’s dental health, it’s well worth it. By working to prevent tooth decay early in life, these children will be more likely to enjoy good dental health in the future.

If you would like more information on dental care for children with special needs, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Managing Tooth Decay in Children with Chronic Diseases.”